Leading with Learning: COVID Series

C!E has always believed that learning, partnership and responsiveness were key characteristics of effective education leaders and systems.  We have learned more in the last two years about HOW leaders driven by a sharp stance on systemic inequity learn, partner and respond.  COVID has brought even more stark contrast to patterns we see among types of leaders and the core behaviors of other adults in the education systems they serve. 

 

Our initial response to COVID has been to open and facilitate dialogue among people in different seats: families, learners, educators, system leaders, non-profit intermediaries, and policymakers about what is happening and what they are feeling. We have been listening long enough to begin sharing insights.  But we also plan to continue to  listen and learn over the next several months.  We hope to elevate themes from these conversations to inform the regional and national processes of re-envisioning the future of schooling.  In this series we ask: which ideas, insights and perspectives should determine the core characteristics of post-COVID equity seeking school systems.

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Fractal Patterns, Playing Jazz, and Other Variations on a Metacognitive Theme

This is not another education think piece on "measuring what matters." I'm not writing to echo the clarion call for more and better assessment of 21st Century skills, noncognitive factors, metacognitive learning strategies, or whatever the nom du jour may be. That's not to say these factors don't matter. Quite the contrary: there is widespread agreement among researchers, business leaders, educators, and policymakers that success after high school requires more than content knowledge and academic skills. Dr. David Conley and my colleagues at the Educational Policy Improvement Center (EPIC) have synthesized two decades of research into a definitional model of college and career readiness that

Common Core Implementation Requires Better Teacher Recruitment and Support

This is the third of a three-part series cross-posted at the National Center for Education and the Economy and Education Week. In this multi-part interview, Marc Tucker talks with Gene Wilhoit about why he thought it so important to create the standards and what he thinks will be needed to fully implement them. Marc Tucker: The best professional development I have seen is in Shanghai, where teachers work together, without facing students, for a substantial part of every day. They have well-developed career ladders, and the teachers near the top of the ladder lead work teams composed of teachers further down the career ladder to improve instruction in the school and to address a myriad of ch

Quality Curriculum is Key to Common Core Implementation

This is the second of a three-part series cross-posted at the National Center for Education and the Economy and EducationWeek. In this multi-part interview, Marc Tucker talks with Wilhoit about why he thought it so important to create the standards and what he thinks will be needed to fully implement them. In the first round, Wilhoit identified four arenas that would have to be addressed to make the Common Core a success: 1) high-quality, coherent and powerful curriculum frameworks and materials matched to the Common Core, 2) high-quality assessments matched to the standards and curriculum, 3) vastly improved programs of initial teacher preparation designed to produce teachers capable of tea

Gene Wilhoit on the Common Core, Part I

This is the first of a three-part series cross-posted at the National Center for Education and the Economy and EducationWeek. In this multi-part interview, Marc Tucker talks with Wilhoit about why he thought it so important to create the standards and what he thinks will be needed to fully implement them. Marc Tucker: Gene, you played the key role in the development of the Common Core, a remarkable achievement. Twenty years ago, our New Standards Project set out to achieve much the same goal. We did not reach the goal line, though. How would you account for your success? Gene Wilhoit: You were ahead of your time. The country wasn’t ready for this idea politically and the states did not hav

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